Front Wheel Removal and Replacement Pictorial

scott123007

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Dallara said:
Just curious... Are you trying to say that only the inboard pistons and pad on the front right brake caliper are the ones linked to the rear brake on the Super Tenere?

If so, please explain how you arrive at this conclusion? Especially since there is only one brake hydraulic hose going from the brake junction below and just aft of the steering stem to the left caliper with then a single hose that crosses over from the left front caliper to the right front caliper...

Sure seems to me that all the front brake pistons and their respective pads are "linked" to the rear brake through the ABS junction/pump/control unit.

Dallara



LOL, yeah, can't wait to hear the explanation for this too.



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Checkswrecks

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Checkswrecks said:
For some reason, I never opened this thread. Nicely done - I have one potential addition to suggest.

For the FJR and Super Tenere, only one brake caliper needs to be removed. Make it the right side caliper and check the brake pads. Because the right inboard is linked to the rear, it wears far faster than the other 3 pads. This is shown in your 12th photo.

So to that photo, my suggestion is to add:
Swap the thinnest pad with the thickest while the wheel is off.
Thanks!

Dallara said:
Just curious... Are you trying to say that only the inboard pistons and pad on the front right brake caliper are the ones linked to the rear brake on the Super Tenere?
...
Sure seems to me that all the front brake pistons and their respective pads are "linked" to the rear brake through the ABS junction/pump/control unit.

True on the Tenere that all the front pistons are hydraulically linked, versus the specific side of the right caliper in the FJR. So the reasons are different and my bad for citing them in making a too-quick post.


However, the context remains that uneven wear is common on most disc brakes and the tire change is an opportunity to even it out. Each of the Tenere front tires I've changed has exposed a more worn inboard front right brake pad, as shown in the Photo on page 1 of this thread, and copied below:



I use a 5,000 mile schedule for checks and oil changes, which includes cleaning & re-lubing the caliper pins. It's made zero difference for uneven brake pad wear on the Tenere. One pad wears quicker than the other three and it's always been the inboard right.

A lot of owners here come fromt he FJR or ST1300. The FJR right front has the linked rear and wears faster, while my old boss and the other ST1300 owners experience the same on their left front.

So again, it takes only a couple of minutes and I still suggest the simple line that I did in my first post:
"Swap the thinnest pad with the thickest while the wheel is off."

Adding that while the pads are out is a chance to clean the caliper contact surfaces for the pads and that you could even re-lube the slider pins.




For full disclosure, some people won't swap pads because the absolute stopping distance may increase for the miles required for the pads to re-bed to the different side of the rotor. They will replace full sets only and not try to maximize pad life. Of course, they will also have slightly longer stopping distances before the new sets of pads bed, as well.
 

Dallara

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Checkswrecks said:
True on the Tenere that all the front pistons are hydraulically linked, versus the specific side of the right caliper in the FJR. So the reasons are different and my bad for citing them in making a too-quick post.

However, the context remains that uneven wear is common on most disc brakes and the tire change is an opportunity to even it out. Each of the Tenere front tires I've changed has exposed a more worn inboard front right brake pad, as shown in the Photo on page 1 of this thread, and copied below:

I use a 5,000 mile schedule for checks and oil changes, which includes cleaning & re-lubing the caliper pins. It's made zero difference for uneven brake pad wear on the Tenere. One pad wears quicker than the other three and it's always been the inboard right.

A lot of owners here come fromt he FJR or ST1300. The FJR right front has the linked rear and wears faster, while my old boss and the other ST1300 owners experience the same on their left front.

So again, it takes only a couple of minutes and I still suggest the simple line that I did in my first post:
"Swap the thinnest pad with the thickest while the wheel is off."

Adding that while the pads are out is a chance to clean the caliper contact surfaces for the pads and that you could even re-lube the slider pins.

For full disclosure, some people won't swap pads because the absolute stopping distance may increase for the miles required for the pads to re-bed to the different side of the rotor. They will replace full sets only and not try to maximize pad life. Of course, they will also have slightly longer stopping distances before the new sets of pads bed, as well.

This is another one of those cases where familiarity with one bike can often cause confusion and potential problems.

So let's look at this point by point...

While it may be the case that your particular Super Tenere wears that one pad quicker than others it may not be the case for other ones. While for various reasons I don't necessarily agree with swapping the "thinnest pad for the thickest" there's no major problem with it if your only goal is to eek out every single mile of a set of pads. Sure people should check their calipers and pads at tire changes, but to do so requires removing *BOTH* calipers during front wheel removal, not "only one brake caliper needs to be removed" as you suggested in your first post in the thread. While it's true only one caliper needs to be removed to pull the wheel, both definitely need to be removed if you're gonna' do close inspection of all pads and pad retaining pins.

Which brings us to those front pad pins...

On the Super Tenere (and I'm not going to mention any other bikes here so as to *AVOID* confusion) the front calipers each have four pistons, two pressing on the inner pad and two pressing on the outer pad. This is quite different from the rear caliper, which has only one piston that presses on the outer pad. The inner pad mounts to the caliper housing, and that housing is mounted on carrier via some bolt *PINS*. When the rear caliper piston presses on its pad it moves the entire caliper over to engage the inner pad, which requires it to slide on those bolt *PINS*, and because of this sliding these bolt *PINS* need to be lubricated... That's one reason they have little boots on them - so dirt and grit doesn't get into the grease on those bolt pins.

OTOH, the little pins in the front calipers are there simply to keep the pads from falling out. The calipers themselves mount rigidly to caliper carriers on the forks. No sliding of the calipers takes place up front.

Now why is this important? Because while Yamaha recommends and specifies specific lube for the *REAR* caliper bolt pins, Yamaha does *NOT* recommend any lube whatsoever for the caliper retaining pins in the front calipers. In fact, you really shouldn't use any lube at all on those pins. Because they directly touch the pad backing plates, and those backing pads dissipate the heat from the pad, and lube you put on those front pad retaining pins could easily liquefy any lube and have it run down onto the backing plate, and maybe even the pad. Granted, any lube was applied extremely judiciously and was high-heat enough the chances of getting lube on the pad may be minimal, but the fact remains that *NO* lube is recommend or specified for these front pad pins. Instead, they should be carefully cleaned, and if you really want to make sure that no surface qualities impede the very tiny movement the pads may make along them then simply polish them up. A small amount of elbow grease, a bit of 400 or 600 grit sandpaper, and maybe even some metal polish will do all you need.

Point is simple... Do *NOT* lube the front caliper retaining pins. Just clean and polish them up, wipe them carefully before insertion, and you're done.

OTOH, you certainly should use the proper lubricant on the rear caliper retaining bolt pins, but that's really for the other thread.

While there may be some Super Tenere owners that come from either Yamaha FJR's or Honda ST1300's, the vast majority probably didn't, and may have come from V-stroms, KLR's, cruisers, etc., etc.... You name it. As with any bike it's important not to treat it exactly like your previous mount, but instead learn all you can about your new bike so you do what it needs. Certainly bring your past experience and wrenching skills from previous bikes along, but don't forget that what worked on one bike may not be what that new one needs.

Just FYI...

Dallara



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Firefight911

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Excellent post Dallara. Excellent!

Specifics on a particular motorcycle are always paramount over generalities from a different one.

My pads are all relatively even in wear. Stock pads with 26,000 miles. Very close to time to swap them. I inspect them after every ride.


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scott123007

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I will add to Dallara's excellent post that "if" you have uneven wear on your pads, it is most likely your caliper pistons binding a little and not returning properly. For exact reasons, that I've never gotten a true handle on, but I suspect, manufacturing clearances, old crystalized brake fluid, or excess brake dust, the seals or "piston rings" as some might call them on the caliper pistons, can bind a little in the cylinder itself, so when the brake lever is released the pistons may still have excess pressure on the pads if the seals are binding in one direction (wheel drag and excessive pad wear), or, binding in the opposite direction, the rolling motion from the seal can "pull back" the piston a couple of thousands which will give you excess lever play.
This explanation is difficult to put into words as these caliper pistons only move a couple of thousands of an inch between "pressure on" and "pressure off" but any binding of that seal at all will cause consequences.
 

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Yamaha replaced all my front seals in the front brake calipers.. There where seals hanging in each unit. I've posed with pictures in the past... There might be a slight issue with a few units. And I've suggested before that everyone take a quick peek at the pistons each time they remove the front wheel... I caught it soon enough where it didn't wear one pad before the other. After the installation of the new wipers and seals they have performed 100%....
 

Dallara

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scott123007 said:
I will add to Dallara's excellent post that "if" you have uneven wear on your pads, it is most likely your caliper pistons binding a little and not returning properly. For exact reasons, that I've never gotten a true handle on, but I suspect, manufacturing clearances, old crystalized brake fluid, or excess brake dust, the seals or "piston rings" as some might call them on the caliper pistons, can bind a little in the cylinder itself, so when the brake lever is released the pistons may still have excess pressure on the pads if the seals are binding in one direction (wheel drag and excessive pad wear), or, binding in the opposite direction, the rolling motion from the seal can "pull back" the piston a couple of thousands which will give you excess lever play.
This explanation is difficult to put into words as these caliper pistons only move a couple of thousands of an inch between "pressure on" and "pressure off" but any binding of that seal at all will cause consequences.

Amen, Scott123007.

As long as we're all here it might be worthwhile to bring up a couple of other interesting points about the brake calipers, their pistons, and those seals.

Those o-ring seals around the caliper pistons are square, or nearly so (some can be slightly trapezoidal) in cross-section, and needless to say they have to seal very tightly to both the caliper bore and piston. But there is another reason they are shaped the way they are and fit so tightly. These seals are what *return* the piston and relieve pressure on the pad when you release the brake lever. When you apply the brakes hydraulic pressure tries to push the pistons out of the caliper, and as such pushes the pad into the disc. When this happens those piston seals *deform*, actually sort of *twisting*, with the piston movement. When brake lever pressure is released these seals act like springs that have been deflected, untwisting and springing back to their original position, and pulling the piston back into the caliper housing and releasing pressure on the pad. As the pad wears, however, these seals do allow the piston to *slide* enough so the piston can compensate for pad wear. As the pads wear the pistons move outward from the caliper incremental distances and try to maintain proper pad location in relation to the disc so that the brakes are always *right there* where you need 'em to be for proper brake performance, yet allowing enough clearance when there is no pressure so that the pads don't drag on the disc.

This brings up an important point about brake maintenance that often gets folks into trouble...

The whole piston-moving-out-to-compensate-for-pad-wear is part of what makes hydraulic brakes sort of *self-adjusting*. But as the brake caliper piston moves out of the caliper housing to compensate for pad wear so does the brake fluid level drop in the master cylinder as fluid displaces the volume in the caliper lost by the piston moving further out of the housing. so as it wears folks add brake fluid to make up for this master cylinder level drop, just as they should...

OK, so now your brake pads are all thin and worn out, and you take them out to pop in a new set... But when you do you see you have to push the brake caliper pistons back into the housing so you have enough room to get the new pads in. but when you do this you force brake fluid up back into the master cylinder. But there's a problem. If you have been adding fluid as the old pads wore then you are suddenly going to have too much fluid in the system. Oh, you may get the new pads in, but now there will be too much fluid in the system, and when you get some heat in the system your brakes will be dragging since with the excess fluid in the system it will be like having the brakes applied all the time... And you get brake drag, excessive brake pad wear, poor fuel mileage, etc.

Point is, when you are replacing your brake pads make sure you pull the cap off the master cylinder and check the brake fluid level *CAREFULLY* after installing the new pads and getting the calipers mounted back up to the carriers and discs. Most likely, if you have been adding fluid as the old pads wore, you will find the level too high, and you will need to remove a bit of fluid to get back to the recommend brake fluid level.

Note, this fluid drop in the master cylinder as the pads wear is the main reason their is a rubber diaphragm in the master cylinder cap. As the fluid drops with pad wear this diaphragm is supposed to distend as the fluid drops, mainly in an attempt to avoid any chance of air getting into the system past the master cylinder piston and valve as the level drops. This is why sometimes as you pull your master cylinder cap off you will see the rubber diaphragm all drawn out, etc. When you add fluid to bring the level back up to normal you need to put the diaphragm back to its original resting position.

Anyway, just remember to check you brake fluid levels carefully after you put in new brake pads and everybody will be rosy!

Just FYI...

Dallara



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Firefight911

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Or, better yet, use this as your opportunity to replace that fluid with fresh DOT 4.


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Icecold Dan

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I know I've read this before but can't seem to find it now. What is everyone using to remove the axle? I think it was a threaded rod coupler, but can't remember the size. I also recall there being a difference in size depending on where it is purchased. Refresh my memory please.

Thanks!
 

Checkswrecks

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Icecold Dan said:
I know I've read this before but can't seem to find it now. What is everyone using to remove the axle? I think it was a threaded rod coupler, but can't remember the size. I also recall there being a difference in size depending on where it is purchased. Refresh my memory please.

Thanks!

I wasn't aware that the size depended on where it was purchased, so will make this simple.
Get a 3/4" wrench from the Tool Department of the hardware store and buy the coupler that it fits on.
 

fredz43

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Checkswrecks said:
I wasn't aware that the size depended on where it was purchased, so will make this simple.
Get a 3/4" wrench from the Tool Department of the hardware store and buy the coupler that it fits on.
That is the best way. I found that the 3/4" couplers sold at Ace Hardware and Loews in this area were a bit less than 19 mm.
 

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Icecold Dan said:
I know I've read this before but can't seem to find it now. What is everyone using to remove the axle? I think it was a threaded rod coupler, but can't remember the size. I also recall there being a difference in size depending on where it is purchased. Refresh my memory please.

Thanks!
Spark plug socket on an extension backwards.

ac
 

Curt

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SpaceTraveler said:
This is a great topic, very well done... but I am not one of those who can do better than my dealer. I think I prefer to pay someone than making mistakes on my front wheel.
I'm sure you can do better. One thing you can undoubtedly do better, and which has not been mentioned in this thread, is the proper cleaning and lubrication during reassembly.

All grease and dirt should be wiped from the axle, spacers, and dust seals and other parts. Use some WD-40 on clean paper towels to dissolve grime.

The dust seals should be packed with grease. Use your finger to heavily load grease into the inner groove of the rubber dust seal on each side of the wheel hub. This will help keep dirt and water out of the bearings.

Also apply a small film of grease to the clean axle. Properly-cared-for motorcycle axles can almost all be removed and installed by hand rather than using a mallet.
 

Pdrhound

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i might be high but i think i left both calipers on last time?

and

properly cared for motorcycle axles should be removed and replaced by hand......:rolleyes: what he said
 

Pdrhound

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i might be high but i think i left both calipers on last time?

and

properly cared for motorcycle axles should be removed and replaced by hand......:rolleyes: what he said
I was wrong. You need to remove passenger side caliper. Reinstalled front tire in less than 10 minutes this time.
 
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