Will you take the vaccine

will you take the vaccine

  • yes

    Votes: 94 56.6%
  • no

    Votes: 15 9.0%
  • maybe later

    Votes: 22 13.3%
  • heck no

    Votes: 13 7.8%
  • BTDT - Got the shot

    Votes: 22 13.3%

  • Total voters
    166

Checkswrecks

Ungenear to broked stuff
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CW has given a warning...any further political discussions about the vaccine in this thread will result in a time out from the forum.
+1

Yes Chris and others, there are all sorts of politicians and we all have thoughts about which may be right or wrong.
That's is different from the fact that we as members having the choice of what to post.
 

tntmo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
320
Location
San Diego, CA
I'm very ambivalent about getting the vaccine. I am under 50, in pretty good health, retired/work from home. I'm not anti-vaccine, but I am a bit skeptical about the speed that this one was developed.

I am happy to wait a while and let all the people who are high risk get it, along with all the people who are high drama.

When it's convenient for me I will likely get it. I'm also waiting to see travel restrictions (within the USA borders) for non-vaccinated personnel. Ze Papers, Please!!
 

Dr Ratbagg

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Joined
Aug 27, 2018
Messages
829
Location
Jet City, WA
Got the Pfizer vaccine and the side effects were mild to none, just a bit of soreness in the arm. Supposedly the side effects (such as fever, chills, tiredness, and headache) throughout the body are more common after the second dose. We shall see about that in 3 weeks.
 

WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
3,296
Location
Ventura, CA
22 hours out and the blah feelings, headache and sinus symptoms are pretty much gone, replaced by a moderately sore arm. No fevers or chills for me on this first go-'round. I am officially half-vaxed now.

I'm very ambivalent about getting the vaccine. I am under 50, in pretty good health, retired/work from home. I'm not anti-vaccine, but I am a bit skeptical about the speed that this one was developed.
I am happy to wait a while and let all the people who are high risk get it, along with all the people who are high drama.
When it's convenient for me I will likely get it. I'm also waiting to see travel restrictions (within the USA borders) for non-vaccinated personnel. Ze Papers, Please!!
At your age, yeah serious complications are less likely, but I have a 42 year old Nephew who has been battling covid for the last 6 weeks. Still feels like crap, been to the ER twice but has so far avoided being admitted, He is also still testing positive and just can't seem to shake it.
 
Last edited:

SilverBullet

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Dec 30, 2014
Messages
1,071
Location
Harmaston, TX
My 93 yr old Mom got the initial Moderna shot this week. First 24 hrs no symptoms then came slight soreness at injection site and her temp was hovering at 100°F for one day. 48 hrs later all is back to normal.

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SHUMBA

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Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
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Location
ONTARIO, CANADA
22 hours out and the blah feelings, headache and sinus symptoms are pretty much gone, replaced by a moderately sore arm. No fevers or chills for me on this first go-'round. I am officially half-vaxed now.



At your age, yeah serious complications are less likely, but I have a 42 year old Nephew who has been battling covid for the last 6 weeks. Still feels like crap, been to the ER twice but has so far avoided being admitted, He is also still testing positive and just can't seem to shake it.
Sorry to hear this....I'm in Canada, and our federal government has really fu☆☆cked up acquiring vaccines.
If I am lucky, I may get a shot by Christmas.
I am slightly suspicious about how so many of these vaccines from a variety of companies have met approval so rapidly.
I'm certainty not an anti vaxxer.
SHUMBA

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WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
3,296
Location
Ventura, CA
Sorry to hear this....I'm in Canada, and our federal government has really fu☆☆cked up acquiring vaccines.
If I am lucky, I may get a shot by Christmas.
I am slightly suspicious about how so many of these vaccines from a variety of companies have met approval so rapidly.
I'm certainty not an anti vaxxer.
SHUMBA

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Well keep in mind they are approved for emergency use only. This is different to a full traditional approval.


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SHUMBA

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Messages
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Location
ONTARIO, CANADA
Well keep in mind they are approved for emergency use only. This is different to a full traditional approval.


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Agree, something is needed..as has been mentioned, this will be the new annual flu shot, which I get every year.
Cases of the flu or influenza are much lower due to (most) people exercising hand washing, wearing masks, nobody shakes hands anymore...
SHUMBA

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Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
441
Location
Denmark
Before the first vaccine was released 78% of the population here in Denmark said they wanted a shot.
Now when people actually get the offer, around 95% accept.
 

Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
441
Location
Denmark
I am slightly suspicious about how so many of these vaccines from a variety of companies have met approval so rapidly.
I'm certainty not an anti vaxxer.
SHUMBA
There is no reason to be suspicious - if you investigate a little you'll find the answers.

Economy:
Vaccine manufacturers got the money up front. They have been given huge capital injections so that they could be finished as soon as possible.

Less bureaucracy:
Before a vaccine can be used, there are piles of documentation that must be reviewed by the drug authorities.
The vaccines must be thoroughly tested in several phases, first on cells in the laboratory, then in animals and then on humans in three large trials.
Before a trial can begin, the vaccine manufacturer must send a description of the trial to the authorities, who will determine whether the trial design is in order and whether it is safe to test the vaccine.
Once the trial is complete, the manufacturer must again submit documentation to obtain the permission of the authorities to proceed to the next trial phase and so on.
The procedure is cumbersome and usually it can take years to get the necessary permits.
During the corona pandemic, the process has accelerated markedly.
The whole regulatory system has been ready to give the vaccines first priority. They have set aside resources to deal with it quickly because it is an emergency.
The European Medicines Agency EMA introduced a system where they reviewed the documentation ongoing while the trials were going on.
In this way, the vaccine manufacturers have been able to go directly from one experimental phase to the next - several have even been given the green light to run the last two experimental phases at the same time.
Normally, the experimental phases are sharply separated, and it can take months to get permission to move on between the different phases.

Prevalence of the disease:
Before knowing if a vaccine works, it must be tested on tens of thousands of people who are given either the active substance or placebo.
Once a sufficient number of the volunteers have been infected with the virus they have been vaccinated against, the researchers examine whether the vaccine works by comparing the number of infected in the two groups.
The more prevalent a virus is, the easier it is to test a vaccine because the faster the number of infections needed to measure an effect is reached.
The last experimental phase usually takes a very long time, because you have to deal with a large number of infected people to be able to judge the effect.
The rarer a disease is, the longer it takes to complete the experiment. The coronavirus was wide spread early on, so you could say that the manufacturers have had favorable conditions for testing the vaccines.

Knowledge:
Researchers have previously worked to develop vaccines against another coronavirus, SARS-CoV-1, which broke out in China in 2002.
Unlike the current coronavirus, the first one disappeared by itself before spreading globally. Therefore, the work of developing vaccines stopped before testing them on humans.
It was no longer possible to raise money to research it. However, some researchers continued to work on examining, in particular, the protein that resides on the surface of coronaviruses.
The vaccine projects from 2002-2003 have not been wasted, because when researchers last year started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus, they did not start from scratch.
From the first virus, a basic knowledge has been obtained, including which area of the virus it would be good to vaccinate against.
This meant that it was possible to start developing a vaccine faster when the new coronavirus broke out in 2019. The vaccine manufacturers had the advantage that there was knowledge to build on.
The producers knew, for example, from 2002 that it is a good idea to make corona vaccines based on the spike proteins that sit like spikes on the virus' surface.
In 2002 - 2003 it was found that the most crucial is the spike protein that coronaviruses use to penetrate the body's cells.
It gave a head start when they started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus. One of the reasons why it has been possible to develop the vaccines so quickly is that it has been possible to reuse knowledge about coronaviruses from the previous outbreak.

Technology:
The first vaccines to come into use was made with technologies that have been under development since the 1990s.
The vaccines do not consist of attenuated or live viruses. Instead, they contain an artificially produced part of the coronavirus' genetic material called mRNA.
In addition, a number of other new and more traditional technologies are in play among the many companies that are currently developing coronavirus vaccines.
In recent years, the development of new vaccine technologies has accelerated.
Biotechnologically we have come an extremely long way in the last 10 years. Technologies have been developed so that the vaccines can be made better and manufactured more quickly.

So there are a number of good reasons why the corona vaccines have come on the scene in record time.
Although the approval procedures have been speeded up, the vaccines are tested as thoroughly as usual before they are approved, and the requirements for documentation of efficacy and safety have not been changed.
 
Last edited:

SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,149
Location
ONTARIO, CANADA
There is no reason to be suspicious - if you investigate a little you'll find the answers.

Economy:
Vaccine manufacturers got the money up front. They have been given huge capital injections so that they could be finished as soon as possible.

Less bureaucracy:
Before a vaccine can be used, there are piles of documentation that must be reviewed by the drug authorities.
The vaccines must be thoroughly tested in several phases, first on cells in the laboratory, then in animals and then on humans in three large trials.
Before a trial can begin, the vaccine manufacturer must send a description of the trial to the authorities, who will determine whether the trial design is in order and whether it is safe to test the vaccine.
Once the trial is complete, the manufacturer must again submit documentation to obtain the permission of the authorities to proceed to the next trial phase and so on.
The procedure is cumbersome and usually it can take years to get the necessary permits.
During the corona pandemic, the process has accelerated markedly.
The whole regulatory system has been ready to give the vaccines first priority. They have set aside resources to deal with it quickly because it is an emergency.
The European Medicines Agency EMA introduced a system where they reviewed the documentation ongoing while the trials were going on.
In this way, the vaccine manufacturers have been able to go directly from one experimental phase to the next - several have even been given the green light to run the last two experimental phases at the same time.
Normally, the experimental phases are sharply separated, and it can take months to get permission to move on between the different phases.

Prevalence of the disease:
Before knowing if a vaccine works, it must be tested on tens of thousands of people who are given either the active substance or placebo.
Once a sufficient number of the volunteers have been infected with the virus they have been vaccinated against, the researchers examine whether the vaccine works by comparing the number of infected in the two groups.
The more prevalent a virus is, the easier it is to test a vaccine because the faster the number of infections needed to measure an effect is reached.
The last experimental phase usually takes a very long time, because you have to deal with a large number of infected people to be able to judge the effect.
The rarer a disease is, the longer it takes to complete the experiment. The coronavirus was wide spread early on, so you could say that the manufacturers have had favorable conditions for testing the vaccines.

Knowledge:
Researchers have previously worked to develop vaccines against another coronavirus, SARS-CoV-1, which broke out in China in 2002.
Unlike the current coronavirus, the first one disappeared by itself before spreading globally. Therefore, the work of developing vaccines stopped before testing them on humans.
It was no longer possible to raise money to research it. However, some researchers continued to work on examining, in particular, the protein that resides on the surface of coronaviruses.
The vaccine projects from 2002-2003 have not been wasted, because when researchers last year started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus, they did not start from scratch.
From the first virus, a basic knowledge has been obtained, including which area of the virus it would be good to vaccinate against.
This meant that it was possible to start developing a vaccine faster when the new coronavirus broke out in 2019. The vaccine manufacturers had the advantage that there was knowledge to build on.
The producers knew, for example, from 2002 that it is a good idea to make corona vaccines based on the spike proteins that sit like spikes on the virus' surface.
In 2002 - 2003 it was found that the most crucial is the spike protein that coronaviruses use to penetrate the body's cells.
It gave a head start when they started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus. One of the reasons why it has been possible to develop the vaccines so quickly is that it has been possible to reuse knowledge about coronaviruses from the previous outbreak.

Technology:
The first vaccines to come into use was made with technologies that have been under development since the 1990s.
The vaccines do not consist of attenuated or live viruses. Instead, they contain an artificially produced part of the coronavirus' genetic material called mRNA.
In addition, a number of other new and more traditional technologies are in play among the many companies that are currently developing coronavirus vaccines.
In recent years, the development of new vaccine technologies has accelerated.
Biotechnologically we have come an extremely long way in the last 10 years. Technologies have been developed so that the vaccines can be made better and manufactured more quickly.

So there are a number of good reasons why the corona vaccines have come on the scene in record time.
Although the approval procedures have been speeded up, the vaccines are tested as thoroughly as usual before they are approved, and the requirements for documentation of efficacy and safety have not been changed.
Now that's an excellent read, I am most grateful to you for taking the time to put this read together....it goes to show you what can be done in times of need.
Thanks again ...more people need to digest this..
SHUMBA

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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,149
Location
ONTARIO, CANADA
Before the first vaccine was released 78% of the population here in Denmark said they wanted a shot.
Now when people actually get the offer, around 95% accept.
Interesting, not likely gonna happen in Canada, too many "fringe" groups.
Religious groups who think someone in the sky will look after them.
Oh oh..here comes a firestorm .
SHUMBA

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Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
6,828
Location
DFW-TEXAS
Before the first vaccine was released 78% of the population here in Denmark said they wanted a shot.
Now when people actually get the offer, around 95% accept.
I don't know about presently, but in from April-August, it was the opposite over here. Didn't make sense. Until everybody gets on board with stopping the virus, it's not going away.
 

SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2018
Messages
1,149
Location
ONTARIO, CANADA
I don't know about presently, but in from April-August, it was the opposite over here. Didn't make sense. Until everybody gets on board with stopping the virus, it's not going away.
Correct!!
SHUMBA

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ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
3,442
Location
California
The issue we have here in CA are all the anti mask/anti vaccine protesters and rioters preventing people entering the vaccination sites. Tito Ortiz MMA fighter is leading the charge. He is bringing his group of followers from city to city.

Dodger stadium vaccination site had to be closed because it was unsafe to enter. At least it wasn't hot out. Thousands of 80+ year olds had to sit in their cars and wait for law enforcement to come and unblock driveways and move the rioters out of the way.

These are not peaceful protests. The perpetrator's are not wearing masks and spitting on cars blocking entry with the threat of breaking windows and injury. Ortiz is flexing his muscles and intimidating the seniors from getting the vaccine. It's sickening.
 

WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
3,296
Location
Ventura, CA
There is no reason to be suspicious - if you investigate a little you'll find the answers.

Economy:
Vaccine manufacturers got the money up front. They have been given huge capital injections so that they could be finished as soon as possible.

Less bureaucracy:
Before a vaccine can be used, there are piles of documentation that must be reviewed by the drug authorities.
The vaccines must be thoroughly tested in several phases, first on cells in the laboratory, then in animals and then on humans in three large trials.
Before a trial can begin, the vaccine manufacturer must send a description of the trial to the authorities, who will determine whether the trial design is in order and whether it is safe to test the vaccine.
Once the trial is complete, the manufacturer must again submit documentation to obtain the permission of the authorities to proceed to the next trial phase and so on.
The procedure is cumbersome and usually it can take years to get the necessary permits.
During the corona pandemic, the process has accelerated markedly.
The whole regulatory system has been ready to give the vaccines first priority. They have set aside resources to deal with it quickly because it is an emergency.
The European Medicines Agency EMA introduced a system where they reviewed the documentation ongoing while the trials were going on.
In this way, the vaccine manufacturers have been able to go directly from one experimental phase to the next - several have even been given the green light to run the last two experimental phases at the same time.
Normally, the experimental phases are sharply separated, and it can take months to get permission to move on between the different phases.

Prevalence of the disease:
Before knowing if a vaccine works, it must be tested on tens of thousands of people who are given either the active substance or placebo.
Once a sufficient number of the volunteers have been infected with the virus they have been vaccinated against, the researchers examine whether the vaccine works by comparing the number of infected in the two groups.
The more prevalent a virus is, the easier it is to test a vaccine because the faster the number of infections needed to measure an effect is reached.
The last experimental phase usually takes a very long time, because you have to deal with a large number of infected people to be able to judge the effect.
The rarer a disease is, the longer it takes to complete the experiment. The coronavirus was wide spread early on, so you could say that the manufacturers have had favorable conditions for testing the vaccines.

Knowledge:
Researchers have previously worked to develop vaccines against another coronavirus, SARS-CoV-1, which broke out in China in 2002.
Unlike the current coronavirus, the first one disappeared by itself before spreading globally. Therefore, the work of developing vaccines stopped before testing them on humans.
It was no longer possible to raise money to research it. However, some researchers continued to work on examining, in particular, the protein that resides on the surface of coronaviruses.
The vaccine projects from 2002-2003 have not been wasted, because when researchers last year started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus, they did not start from scratch.
From the first virus, a basic knowledge has been obtained, including which area of the virus it would be good to vaccinate against.
This meant that it was possible to start developing a vaccine faster when the new coronavirus broke out in 2019. The vaccine manufacturers had the advantage that there was knowledge to build on.
The producers knew, for example, from 2002 that it is a good idea to make corona vaccines based on the spike proteins that sit like spikes on the virus' surface.
In 2002 - 2003 it was found that the most crucial is the spike protein that coronaviruses use to penetrate the body's cells.
It gave a head start when they started developing vaccines against the new coronavirus. One of the reasons why it has been possible to develop the vaccines so quickly is that it has been possible to reuse knowledge about coronaviruses from the previous outbreak.

Technology:
The first vaccines to come into use was made with technologies that have been under development since the 1990s.
The vaccines do not consist of attenuated or live viruses. Instead, they contain an artificially produced part of the coronavirus' genetic material called mRNA.
In addition, a number of other new and more traditional technologies are in play among the many companies that are currently developing coronavirus vaccines.
In recent years, the development of new vaccine technologies has accelerated.
Biotechnologically we have come an extremely long way in the last 10 years. Technologies have been developed so that the vaccines can be made better and manufactured more quickly.

So there are a number of good reasons why the corona vaccines have come on the scene in record time.
Although the approval procedures have been speeded up, the vaccines are tested as thoroughly as usual before they are approved, and the requirements for documentation of efficacy and safety have not been changed.
Exactly correct! I might add that between the previous corona virus work and the outbreak of SARS-Covid-2, they were working on applying mRNA vaccines to ebola and zika viruses, which helped continue to refine the technology. The main thing needed in order to redirect this technology to the current virus was to identify which RNA sequence of the genome coded for the spike protein (which as mentioned above they already knew what they were looking for) and then synthesize it.

I read the other day where the percentage of Americans that said they will get the vaccine has increased. As far as "Covidiots" blocking vaccination sites, I saw nothing of the sort where I went here in Ventura County, none of the folks I know that have gotten a vaccination has encountered such and I have not heard about it happening elsewhere outside of the Dodger Stadium incident. I don't thing these jerks are having any measurable effect, even the closure at Dodger Stadium was temporary. Biggest problem we have in CA is vaccine supply. A couple of my friends with established appointments had them cancelled due to lack of supply.
 
Last edited:

Sierra1

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Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
6,828
Location
DFW-TEXAS
Tito has always been an arrogant, conceited prick. The fact that there are groups that feel that they have the right to force their opinions onto other people, with impunity, doesn't surprise me. And, they don't feel that they are being hypocrites when they force their opinions onto people, but feel that nobody has the right to do the same to them. One of the ingredients in the ever increasing anti-police sentiment. Don't like masks, and vaccines. . . . fine. . . . don't use them. But, it pisses me off when other people tell me, let alone physically force me, to their way of thinking. If my actions do not have any effect on your life. . . . why would you care. Ok. . . . off of my soap box.

Me? I'm a firm believer in walk softly, and carry a big stick. I'll be as nice as people let me. Which brings me to my other mantra: Don't start none, won't be none. :)
 
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