The anything thread.

Tenman

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Dec 7, 2013
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Natchez Ms USA
Probably left hand threads on the truck. I've got a bucket truck and a gooseneck with lh threads. I hatem. Gotta watch guys a the tire store. They have rungem off quick before with impact guns and just say "sorry".
 

gunslinger_006

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May 21, 2016
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Seattle, Washington
Probably left hand threads on the truck. I've got a bucket truck and a gooseneck with lh threads. I hatem. Gotta watch guys a the tire store. They have rungem off quick before with impact guns and just say "sorry".
I didnt realize that was a thing.

Meaning: Using lh threads for lugs.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Checkswrecks

Ungenear to broked stuff
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I didnt realize that was a thing.

Meaning: Using lh threads for lugs.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Pretty common on trucks and trailers and that looks like the door of the old Isuzu we had and a quick Google search shows they used lh lug nuts. It was a pretty good truck.
 

blitz11

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SW Montana
My daughter rode her aluminum-framed bicycle to school every day when we lived in Minneapolis (even all winter). It was becoming pretty ratted out, and the bottom bracket finally gave up the ghost two months before she graduated from high school. it was too loose to ride, so i decided that we had to replace it. Well, the salt/de-icers used in MPLS bonded the steel bottom bracket cup to the aluminum frame, even with the generous use of never-seize (well, i guess it is "almost never-seize," but i digress.)

I used my Shimano tool, a big pipe wrench, a 6' cheater bar, and tied the bike down on my motorcycle trailer while it was connected to my volvo. My daughter held the propane torch to the bottom bracket shell, and I pulled on the cheater bar to get the shell loose. As soon as she'd take the heat off, the bottom bracket cup would freeze in the shell.

it took us about 30 minutes, but we had it apart. Surprisingly, the threads were not destroyed, and i was able to install another bottom bracket. The day she graduated, we put her bike in the alley - it was gone the next morning. it had served us well. i was really shocked that the threads weren't toast.

(that daughter earned an engineering degree. she's become quite the mechanic.)
 

magic

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MENASHA, WISCONSIN
Left hand lug nuts on the driver's side were pretty common on many American cars too. Dodge and Chrysler products used them up until about 1975. Some Buick, Pontiac and Oldsmobiles prior to 1965 had them too. The problems started when someone not familiar with the left hand lugs tried to remove them with an impact wrench, tightening the hell out of them or breaking the studs off. The studs and lug nuts usually are stamped with an "L".
 

PhilPhilippines

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I knew about "wrong way" threads because of the directional "knock-offs" or "knock-off spinners"KOSpinners.jpg used in racing and Ferraris, Cobras(?), etc. I'm sure there are plenty of expensive stories around...
 

bimota

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IMG_20200717_142206074.jpg
JUST SAW THIS ON FACEBOOK. So I’m riding Sunday on my BMW 1250 GS with my friend
Jeff Sachs
on the first week of the TAT. We are near Asheville, North Carolina on Table Top Rd when I sense something in my peripheral vision. Before I know it, a 50 maple tree falls from a hill 15’ above the road and lands ON my bike just ahead of the handlebars. The bike stops instantly in its tracks. The TFT screen and various brackets, parts and electrical components were spread randomly a few feet around the bike. Sadly, I think Pegasus took too big a hit for me. I am humbly grateful to have had very minor injuries...however, extremely grateful the tree didn’t land 24” further back. Enjoy the photos.
IMG_20200717_142206074.jpg
 
Last edited:

Dirt_Dad

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Dang, glad you're okay.

You are the second person I'm aware of to be hit by a tree. The first guy did not fare as well as you. That one happened during one of our Romney events. I was leading a group ride and came across a group of riders standing around a fallen tree. They asked me, "do you know how to get a hold of Dirt_Dad?" I've heard that question twice, always bad news to follow. The rider hit by the tree was stunned, but mobile. Fortunately that was the first year ChecksWrecks implemented our rider wristband/info policy. I was able to get his wristband and a quick call later knew who he was and who to contact.

Trees can be bad news for road users regardless of number of wheels on the vehicle. Glad you're not hurt.
 

magic

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MENASHA, WISCONSIN
I knew about "wrong way" threads because of the directional "knock-offs" or "knock-off spinners"View attachment 80017 used in racing and Ferraris, Cobras(?), etc. I'm sure there are plenty of expensive stories around...
I have also seen and worked on some older cars that had left hand thread spindles on the left side and right hand threads on the right side. The spindle nuts tighten the wheel bearings and were also retained with a cotter pin.
 

WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
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I saw a You Tube video a while back of a couple of British riders traveling down what looked to be a serene country lane, when a tree fell on the second rider. It was all caught on his GoPro. He was really lucky given the size of the tree not to have been hit with the trunk. Amazingly he didn't even go down.

 
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