The 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700

jeckyll

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 11, 2016
Messages
264
Location
Lotusland
So, does this bike have tubeless tires? I know this may not be a big issue for some but that is a deal breaker for me.
Can of course be changed.

For this kind of bike I would expect to have tubes. Especially since you might bend a rim while riding.

My $0.02
 

Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
311
Location
Denmark
Can of course be changed.

For this kind of bike I would expect to have tubes. Especially since you might bend a rim while riding.

My $0.02
At first I would have liked tubeless on the T7, but now I really don't mind that it run tubes, as it has its benefits as well.

If a tubeless tire have broken the bead due to a puncture it can be a bitch to fix in the field, and as some punctures can't be fixed with a plug, it's a good idea to bring tire irons (and a tube) anyway if you embark on a long journey.

It takes longer to replace a tube than to plug a tubeless, but I don't get punctures often enough for it to be a deciding factor, and when it does happen, spending 20 minutes replacing a tube vs. 10 minutes plugging a tire isn't a big deal.

If tubeless is a must, there is options out there to convert the wheels.
 

jeckyll

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 11, 2016
Messages
264
Location
Lotusland
At first I would have liked tubeless on the T7, but now I really don't mind that it run tubes, as it has its benefits as well.

If a tubeless tire have broken the bead due to a puncture it can be a bitch to fix in the field, and as some punctures can't be fixed with a plug, it's a good idea to bring tire irons (and a tube) anyway if you embark on a long journey.

It takes longer to replace a tube than to plug a tubeless, but I don't get punctures often enough for it to be a deciding factor, and when it does happen, spending 20 minutes replacing a tube vs. 10 minutes plugging a tire isn't a big deal.

If tubeless is a must, there is options out there to convert the wheels.
Yeah, I've whacked the hell out of my wheels on 650 / 685 ADV bikes in the past, leading to rims that would not have held any air without a tube.
I feel better knowing there's a tube in there... for the most part. Tire choice becomes important, I tried to change a flat on a K60 (mounted on a KLR) and it took 3 guys, all over 200 lbs, bouncing on long tire levers for about 5 minutes before we got bead to move. Brutal tire to do by hand in the bush :)

Both tubeless and tubed have their benefits.
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2019
Messages
85
Location
Saltillo, MS
You can have strong wired rims and tubeless tires. Just seems like the Yamaha decided to cheap out in that respect.
 

Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
3,350
Location
DFW-TEXAS
I'm not going to say whether they are right or wrong, but I don't think that tubed tires was a monetary decision. MY, thoughts are that they intend for this bike to be taken much further off road, and incurring a larger amount of damage to the tires and/or rims. Like Don T said, some holes can't be fixed with a plug.
 

Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
311
Location
Denmark
You can have strong wired rims and tubeless tires. Just seems like the Yamaha decided to cheap out in that respect.
All manufacturers cheap out to some degree on most models.
It's a constant calculation between what people want and what they are willing to pay.

That said, I don't think cutting costs is the only reason Yamaha chose tubed tires for the T7 - it also sends a signal about what kind of use the bike is intended for.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
1,844
Location
Fullerton, CA
All manufacturers cheap out to some degree on most models.
It's a constant calculation between what people want and what they are willing to pay.

That said, I don't think cutting costs is the only reason Yamaha chose tubed tires for the T7 - it also sends a signal about what kind of use the bike is intended for.
Very true Don. For hard core off road use, there is no reason to run tubeless. A bent or flat spotted rim will end a ride with a tubeless tire. I actually prefer tubed over tubeless.

The shaft drive and tubeless tires kind of turned me off buying the Super Tenere. After I had an extensive test ride I was able to overlook the those 2 major shortcomings of the bike. The complicated repairs and inability to change gearing sucks on the Super Tenere. I keep spare tubes with me at all times. It does no take much to damage a rim off road.

The 700 is very simple. Lube the chain and ride. Change gearing for cheap, replace sprockets and chain for cheap, etc.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
1,844
Location
Fullerton, CA
I might add that for it's intended purpose shaft drive and tubeless is not a problem on the Super Tenere. The OEM gearing is pretty darn good. I was turned off by the shaft drive at first. But from what I can see it's pretty reliable until something goes wrong. Then it's big money and labor to repair.

As far as tubeless, that is a topic that is split down the middle on opinions. For me, on the street tubeless is just ok. For safety, tubes are the only way to go. A blow out on a tubeless tire can be a real handful to get to the side of the road safely. With double rim locks and UHD tubed tire you can ride out a flat to safety without the fear of tire coming off the rim.

In reality almost every person who wants shaft drive and tubeless tires is for ease of maintenance. Let's face it, changing tires on a T700 is going to be a chore on the side of the road.
 

Jlq1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2018
Messages
406
Location
Argentina
I will not talk about manageability, but design an adventure motorcycle, where the radiator is wider than the same motorcycle, and have to make a whole structure to help cover it in a fall? .... if I were in that office design, I would have ruled out flat, for a 800cm3 motorcycle. Perhaps the compression and the search for power to be more than the others, leads them to need more cooling. Today I went to see this 790, and for a 700-800, I still share the design of the T7 / gs800. Maybe in the photos you don't notice so much, but it is extremely wide down for an 800. If at this width, you have to add some crash bars, it's almost like a boxer. Is incredible....
3B552403-B474-4FCA-A005-6A9C6876B0C3.jpeg400DE256-2963-46CC-8FE3-92C09DA9AB67.jpeg03F5C607-9A59-42B9-8699-526B8B378FE1.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Nikolajsen

"Keep it simple"
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
1,673
Location
Denmark
Yamaha got a European approval for a new model.
With the internal model name XTZ690D-B.:cool:

BUT...
It seems to be same engine (72 HP).
Same wheel base
Same height (so suspension might have same travel, unless at is a new frame)
Same weight
 
Last edited:

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
1,844
Location
Fullerton, CA
I will not talk about manageability, but design an adventure motorcycle, where the radiator is wider than the same motorcycle, and have to make a whole structure to help cover it in a fall? .... if I were in that office design, I would have ruled out flat, for a 800cm3 motorcycle. Perhaps the compression and the search for power to be more than the others, leads them to need more cooling. Today I went to see this 790, and for a 700-800, I still share the design of the T7 / gs800. Maybe in the photos you don't notice so much, but it is extremely wide down for an 800. If at this width, you have to add some crash bars, it's almost like a boxer. Is incredible....
View attachment 64020
WOW!! The tape measure don't lie!! Almost 160mm of overhang is a lot! I do see where KTM is going with this though. It offers protection and keeps the fuel weight down low. All the while giving the bike more capacity and better handling characteristics. And I believe it's meant to be that way so you don't have to add crash bars. Of course the aftermarket is filled with crash bars for this bike.
 

Jlq1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2018
Messages
406
Location
Argentina
WOW!! The tape measure don't lie!! Almost 160mm of overhang is a lot! I do see where KTM is going with this though. It offers protection and keeps the fuel weight down low. All the while giving the bike more capacity and better handling characteristics. And I believe it's meant to be that way so you don't have to add crash bars. Of course the aftermarket is filled with crash bars for this bike.
That is why I did not discuss manageability. Obviously the low weight is better, but I saw it very wide below. Equally mine are just doubts. The same doubt that generated the cat of the AT 1100. If some users of the Gs 1250, after driving it for a while at medium-high speed, complain that they literally cook their right ankle, when I saw where the 1100 catalyst, I wondered what would happen with the right foot. Obviously, the hotter and closer the engine is to the cat, the better it does its job.
0342E28E-17DD-4EEC-9AA3-EE1B7825DEA5.jpegCBC5AA89-C877-4284-B20E-8DF16DCDF757.jpeg
 

eemsreno

Well-Known Member
Founding Member
2011 Site Supporter
2012 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2010
Messages
2,639
Location
On your way to everywhere, , Iowa
As far as tubeless, that is a topic that is split down the middle on opinions. For me, on the street tubeless is just ok. For safety, tubes are the only way to go. A blow out on a tubeless tire can be a real handful to get to the side of the road safely. With double rim locks and UHD tubed tire you can ride out a flat to safety without the fear of tire coming off the rim

I could not disagree with you more on tubes and tubeless.
I was riding my wife [Girlfriend then ] on my dads 350 Honda when the rear tire picked up a spike and blew out instantly, we slid that bike sideways at 55 mph down the highway. The tire came right off the rim.
I have been a firm believer after that, It should be illegal for a street bike to have tubes in the tires. To this day I see guys buying cruisers with spoked wheels with tubes and I think to myself just how stupid they are.
Tubeless tires on street bikes is probable the biggest safety improvement ever made to motorcycles.

As far as the 350 Honda incidence went, I knew Michelle was a keeper when after we got stopped and ask her " weren't you scared?" She said " I knew you could handle it".
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
1,844
Location
Fullerton, CA
I could not disagree with you more on tubes and tubeless.
I was riding my wife [Girlfriend then ] on my dads 350 Honda when the rear tire picked up a spike and blew out instantly, we slid that bike sideways at 55 mph down the highway. The tire came right off the rim.
I have been a firm believer after that, It should be illegal for a street bike to have tubes in the tires. To this day I see guys buying cruisers with spoked wheels with tubes and I think to myself just how stupid they are.
Tubeless tires on street bikes is probable the biggest safety improvement ever made to motorcycles.

As far as the 350 Honda incidence went, I knew Michelle was a keeper when after we got stopped and ask her " weren't you scared?" She said " I knew you could handle it".
Tubeless tires cannot run rim locks. If you have a blow out or sudden flat you are in the same exact situation as you had on your dads bike. Did your dads 350 have double rim locks holding the tire to the rim? I'm pretty sure those old 350 Hondas did not run rim locks and had very flimsy tires.

The first thing I do with almost every one of my tubed bikes is remove the tires and drill for another rim lock. The exception is my Beta. With the Kenda Big Blocks there is no need for more than one rim lock. The bead is very stiff so I just run one Motion Pro Ultra Light rim lock per tire.

How good do double rim locks work? Well I got a flat on my KTM 300 over 50 miles from my parents home in Boulder City NV. I rode all the way back melting the tire to the rim. Over 20 miles of it pavement. No damage to the rim. Just replaced the tire and tube. Running sweep for Ride For Kids charity ride a few years back. I got a front flat on my Beta. Simply zip tied the tire and rode it out until we almost got to the freeway.

Everyone has their own risk assessment. I error on the side of caution when it comes to bike safety.
 

ArkieTenere

Member
Joined
May 3, 2013
Messages
121
Location
Arkansas
Is it illegal for you to carry a tube as a back up to your tubeless tire? You would think so the way folks talk about tubeless. I’m perplexed.... perhaps not ideal with rim shapes but should work in an emergency situation shouldn’t it, when a plug won’t work?
 
Last edited:

Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
3,350
Location
DFW-TEXAS
I'm pretty sure you can put a tube in a tubeless, but, obviously it won't work in reverse. And, especially in a case where the plug isn't enough. It might build up more heat, but that beats sitting around waiting for help.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
1,844
Location
Fullerton, CA
Is it illegal for you to carry a tube as a back up to your tubeless tire? You would think so the way folks talk about tubeless. I’m perplexed.... perhaps not ideal with rim shapes but should work in an emergency situation shouldn’t it, when a plug won’t work?
Yes tubes will work just fine in an emergency. All it takes is one hard hit from a rock to bend or crack a rim enough so the bead won't seat.
 

Dirt_Dad

Well-Known Member
Founding Member
2011 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 21, 2010
Messages
4,417
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
Nick Sanders is at it again..this time on a T700.


Could make you start to think the T7 really is a good travel bike.
 
Top