Rider's Clinic - Helping us ride better

Venture

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The idea for this board was a request for somewhere to share negative (or positive I guess) riding experiences, with the intent of asking for tips on how to become better riders. Feel free to share all experiences or ask for tips in this board.
 

phplemel

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Best tip I can offer, suck it up & enroll in a Rawhyde Adventure course. I did it this spring & (don't tell them) but they could have charged twice as much and it would still be worth it ::018::
I took my S10 and was glad of it, even after 30+ yrs of riding it increased my confidence level by 1000%
Best health insurance premium I ever paid. I'm sure since April I have used the Rawhyde knowledge to save my bike & myself
many more times than once :)) It also opened my eyes as to what these bikes are capable of even if I'm not ::005::
Give Jim a call, best investment you will ever make! Tell him I sent you, I need brownie points for my next course ::018::
http://www.rawhyde-offroad.com/home.html
 

EricV

Riding, farkling, riding...
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Another option, rather less expensive and can be tailored to individual needs. Wife and I are going to make time to do this, hopefully this year in June or Sept.
http://www.offrouteadv.com/
 

shrekonwheels

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After 24 years of Riding and shunning the MSF and all that nonsense I would run into Lance Holst. Nice guy and I decided to take his Advanced Rider Clinic, holy shit did I learn a ton.

Not only would I do it again, I would love to take other courses as well and I am very interested in Lee Parks Total Control.

Tips:
Careful who you take advice from, even those who have ridden for years know very little about riding in all actuality, but hte pros? Be it dirt or track, they have to know their shit. Myths and misconceptions do not win races, which unfortunately the average rider is full of nothing but nonsense. If you are talking to someone and they do not know what counter stearing is or thinks laying a bike down is a good optino, walk away, and do not look over your shoulder or GOD WILL TURN YOU INTO A PILLAR OF SALT! :))

Most people riding at what they think is 80 percent are actually riding at 120 percent, let that one sink in for a minute before reading on.

Track days are a big one to help gain confidence and learn skills, you learn a bunch right there and myths have to quickly go out the window.

Cycling actually transfers directly over and really helps with balance as well as endurance, if you are healthy you are more alert and fatigue less easily. I also believe that riding horses in my younger years helped as well.

Riding off road should be done with lighter bikes before the big boys, get yourself a 250 which has plenty of power for any size, go and practice, play around, be a hooligan and learn tons.

Eat right and stay hydrated, again this transfers over directly to being alert and being a better rider.

Be comfortable with all your gear as well as the bike, if you are not comfortable you are not alert and paying attention to the road.

Be it pavement or dirt, look well far away as your body cannot react if you simply look right in front of you.

Always stay committed and go for whatever it is you are doing, if you hit a corner too hot do not hit the brake, stay on the throttle and go for it, same goes if you are riding something technical and it seems you are fubar, You will wreck far more often simply giving up half way than you ever would have just staying on it and going for it. It will be scary, I promise but it is far better than the alternative.

Trust your tires, todays tires are amazing and will hold the road very well, trust them and go with them, that goes along with the new tires are slick BS, nonsense. Even if they are (which they are not) being afraid of a new tire implies you would be unable to handle your bike in rain, snow or mud.

Quit making excuses, if something happens it probably is rider error, be objective, set aside your ego and be honest about what just happened, otherwise you are not helping yourself or anyone else at all.

The street is no place to race. While we all enjoy a spirited ride from time to time, there are simply too many factors which can impede your ride which do not exist on the track. Those factors may be dirt, cow shit, animals or even a car simply stopped around the corner, you do not know and owe it to your family to COME HOME LATE AT NIGHT.
Dont get me wrong, I believe strongly in living and enjoying your life, but the chest beating idiocy and acting like a teenager does no one a favor, save it for a controlled environment.

Bright Colors save lives, this is not even up for debate on any level.

A well Maintained bike adds to your confidence, be it on a long trip, or a spirited canyon ride it will help bring you home safely.

Tell people where you are going and keep ID on you. Your cell phone should also be programmed with an emergency contact. If you are on medications, a list of those should be on your person.
 

doodad

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upstate kansas city
Has anyone attended one of the rider training courses recently?

I read at the beginning of this thread that phplemel got a lot out of the rawhyde course back in 2012. I don't know what it cost then but it is now $1500. The training with Bill Dragoo that gunner mentioned is now $600 and Dusty Wessel's course is $800. Both of those also have upgrades available to add a couple days of riding after the training. There are obviously a plethora of videos to watch too that are free.

If you have gone to one, how was your experience and was it worth the money? I am interested personally in the US-based classes but I'd also like to hear if classes outside the US were beneficial to you. Also wondering if it is something worth doing when just getting back to riding and brand new to adventure bike riding (I rode dirt bikes 30 years ago) or if I should be spending a season (or more) riding pavement to get to know the bike better before spending the $$.

Thanks in advance for your insights!
 

Checkswrecks

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Welcome aboard Doodad,

Head on over to the MSF (motorcycle safety foundation) site and look for one of their Return to Riding courses.
 

doodad

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Welcome aboard Doodad,

Head on over to the MSF (motorcycle safety foundation) site and look for one of their Return to Riding courses.
Thanks Checkswrecks, I did take the BRC in the Fall and signed up for a BRC2 class this Spring which will be on pavement. I was just hoping others may have attended one of the adventure bike training courses and could comment on whether it was worth it to them for off-pavement experience. From the silence I'm thinking most must be learning on their own, which may not be a bad idea seeing how expensive the classes are now!
 

Jlq1969

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Always a course (or a good friend with experience), they will teach you useful things. But until you do, and in case you go off road, the first thing you have to know is that the abs on the S10 cannot be switched off (it can be done through a trick, but the permanent one is “normal activated”)…. .in case of descending a slope greater than 15 degrees, the activated abs is dangerous...so you have options to lower it 1) you do it with the engine off 2) you turn off the engine before starting the descent (if you do not exceed 10km/h the abs will be off) 3) use the tricks that are in the forum (look for them)….and the same for a climb….the traction control will not let you skid the rear wheel and you will not be able to climb it…here you have the option to turn it off from the dash… If you are going to ride fast on gravel, you can choose the level of TCS that is comfortable for you, but if you did not disconnect the abs, you just have to anticipate the braking, and keep trying until you get used to its level of intrusion (which is one of the least intrusive) in gravel…..whatever else you can learn in the course, it will be general for any motorcycle…..what I told you about the abs and tcs, is particular to the S10.
And if I'm saying something stupid, please correct me, surely it's the side effects of the overdose of anti covid vaccines:):)
 
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Checkswrecks

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Seems to me that we have a bunch of members in the KC area. Maybe you can hook up with some of them.
 

Wallkeeper

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Doodad, the BRC2 uses many of the same exercises as the BRC except you do them on your bike. I know the MSF was developing a 1 day ADV course. The prototype course seemed worth while and was expected to be reasonably priced but it does not look like it has gone prime time yet. In Minnesota, off road courses are offered by the DNR so it might be worthwhile checking with both the DVS and DNR in Kansas and Missouri to see if they have any offerings.

The MN Rider Coaches have training this week. I will check and see if anyone has any info more current on the MSF course
 

Sierra1

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I was planning on being an MSF instructor. Took the first aid class, and everything. Then I found out that I'd have to work weekends . . . . :rolleyes:
 

Wallkeeper

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I was planning on being an MSF instructor. Took the first aid class, and everything. Then I found out that I'd have to work weekends . . . . :rolleyes:
Pays just enough to cover dinner at “Le Arcs d’or” for the wife and me…no tip
 

doodad

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Always a course (or a good friend with experience), they will teach you useful things. But until you do, and in case you go off road, the first thing you have to know is that the abs on the S10 cannot be switched off (it can be done through a trick, but the permanent one is “normal activated”)…. .in case of descending a slope greater than 15 degrees, the activated abs is dangerous...so you have options to lower it 1) you do it with the engine off 2) you turn off the engine before starting the descent (if you do not exceed 10km/h the abs will be off) 3) use the tricks that are in the forum (look for them)….and the same for a climb….the traction control will not let you skid the rear wheel and you will not be able to climb it…here you have the option to turn it off from the dash… If you are going to ride fast on gravel, you can choose the level of TCS that is comfortable for you, but if you did not disconnect the abs, you just have to anticipate the braking, and keep trying until you get used to its level of intrusion (which is one of the least intrusive) in gravel…..whatever else you can learn in the course, it will be general for any motorcycle…..what I told you about the abs and tcs, is particular to the S10.
And if I'm saying something stupid, please correct me, surely it's the side effects of the overdose of anti covid vaccines:):)
Thanks for the heads up on the ABS and TCS, I will search the forum for the tricks you mentioned. I have a lot to learn about the bike and did not know the ABS could not be (easily) turned off. I plan to get a manual for the bike too and from reading the forum it looks like yamahapubs.com is the only legit way to get one so I'll check that out.
 

pilleway

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Mexico
Great comments, suggestions and recomendations.,
For me, no dought, training, courses, get help from well experience riders, be humble to recongize for improvement and willing to be better driver will help to enjoy every ride.
I would like to add, every time I'm in a ride I look for incidents to me, they will tell me how much I'm fully attending or concentrated while driving, but if I see that got one and soon another, then I will consider go back home and take a brake (I have canceled a couple of trips because some factors told me not to go, and I recomend we should be aware and consider them), probably that is not your day, and you my better watching a movie than riding that day a bike, the day after can be a good day for a ride.
Enjoy and have safe rides!
 

doodad

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Doodad, the BRC2 uses many of the same exercises as the BRC except you do them on your bike. I know the MSF was developing a 1 day ADV course. The prototype course seemed worth while and was expected to be reasonably priced but it does not look like it has gone prime time yet. In Minnesota, off road courses are offered by the DNR so it might be worthwhile checking with both the DVS and DNR in Kansas and Missouri to see if they have any offerings.

The MN Rider Coaches have training this week. I will check and see if anyone has any info more current on the MSF course
I was excited to see on the MSF website that an ADVRC class is listed with the dirt bike courses. But like you said it is not available yet, or at least not within 500 miles of KC. Maybe there's just no instructors available yet in the area. If you want to take it on it would be worth the ride up to Minnesota :)
 
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