Losing rear brake after a good bleed.

Thetractorman

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Thinking it through overnight. I would ride quite enthusiastically solo and do big continental tours with the other half FULLY loaded.
Did you discover why the back brake went off again?
If your initial fix hasn't totally worked, or you were unsure of it, I may go for the bypass. I had a GS 1150 some years ago and predictably same issue! (as most did) I bypassed it and the bike was all the better for it.
Admittedly the Yamaha system is a better concept, and although I like the idea of having abs. In almost 45 years of riding I've never actually needed it.

Did you use the old pipe work in your bypass?

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MikeinNZ

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No I made up new pipes out of 3/16 copper brake line. I purchased long threaded M10 tube nuts x4 (eBay) so I didn’t wreck the original pipes.
The pipes are just a staggered U that bypasses each side of the ABS. The left 2 (looking forward) are the rear in and out.
The right 2 are the front in and out.
Just remove all 4 grey lines that go from the mounting block to the ABS unit, blank the ABS unit ports to keep the dirt out, I used aluminium tape.
Fit the U pipes, bleed and ride.
The ABS light cycles like it should on the dash with ignition and as the ABS ecu never sees any brake pressure it doesn’t fault.
My bike passed its road worthiness inspection even though the ABS doesn’t work
I would think any engineering outfit that can repair boat trailer brake lines would be able to fabricate them for you. Once the nuts are on the pipe they need flaring.C68E641D-7C1A-404F-AD06-C8E7B096B5EE.jpeg43681A64-3CF9-4D6C-A471-69BA3A9388C1.jpeg
 
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ballisticexchris

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No I made up new pipes out of 3/16 copper brake line. I purchased long threaded M10 tube nuts x4 (eBay) so I didn’t wreck the original pipes.
The pipes are just a staggered U that bypasses each side of the ABS. The left 2 (looking forward) are the rear in and out.
The right 2 are the front in and out.
Just remove all 4 grey lines that go from the mounting block to the ABS unit, blank the ABS unit ports to keep the dirt out, I used aluminium tape.
Fit the U pipes, bleed and ride.
The ABS light cycles like it should on the dash with ignition and as the ABS ecu never sees any brake pressure it doesn’t fault.
My bike passed its road worthiness inspection even though the ABS doesn’t work
I would think any engineering outfit that can repair boat trailer brake lines would be able to fabricate them for you. Once the nuts are on the pipe they need flaring.View attachment 60508View attachment 60509
That is a really slick and easy way to bypass the ABS!! Thanks for the tip. And no need to use new brake lines. Old school braking for the guys who don't want ABS.
 

Thetractorman

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Thank you very much again for your time.
I only found your initial post via Google, and as a result only got to see a tiny proportion. I've been on the other S10 forum for best part of 4 years.
All I saw was your earlier fix, when you cut out just the rear. That's why I couldn't understand why the rear went soft again!
Since, I went through your whole post in this forum. WOW 'Tenacity' doesn't even come close! You deserved the fix to have worked.

Yes, I'm going to bypass as you outlined. As you also recommended, if I have a lottery win I'll buy a new unit. Used is too risky and I'll probably just have to take the hit when I eventually sell.

Thx again
Gavin

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ballisticexchris

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Just be weary the brakes are quite powerful with the ABS bypassed. It doesn’t take long to get used to. Having a reliable rear brake is how it should be.
Question on how this happened in the first place. I noticed the original ABS pistons you posted were really chewed up. Were you good about flushing your brake fluid every season to get the moisture out?
 

Thetractorman

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Bypassed. Got the smile you talked about in an earlier post. The front has a better feel to it as well.
In the dealer buying head bearings, asked in passing how much a new ABS module was, second hand could have me back in trouble.
£2011... Even the dealer parts guy was embarrassed!
Needless to say........


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MikeinNZ

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Question on how this happened in the first place. I noticed the original ABS pistons you posted were really chewed up. Were you good about flushing your brake fluid every season to get the moisture out?
.
Have a read of “ what the inside of a bad ABS unit looks like” when you have a spare hour. Unfortunately bleeding won’t help the piston tops as they are in a vented cavity.
 

RCinNC

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One thing this thread tells me is that if I buy a used S10, to make sure the ABS system is working and the pump hasn't been bypassed and the seller didn't mention it. A grand for an ABS pump is insane.
 

MikeinNZ

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when are you going to start repairing them?
Hey Patrick, unfortunately I can’t say I have repaired it yet. Still waiting on the machinist.
As I mentioned earlier the piston seals and eccentric bearing are made from unobtainium and depending on the damage depends if they are fixable. I’ll keep buying lottery tickets for now.
 

RCinNC

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Chris, it would be insane to pay a grand for a replacement pump in a used bike where the pump may well be a third or fourth of the total value of the bike. Hence the reason for my post about making sure the pump actually works if you buy a used bike.

As for the actual price of the unit, that may have a lot more to do with market forces and supply and demand than it does with the level of engineering and quality of parts that goes into its manufacture. They may simply be that expensive because they don't fail that often so there aren't that many of them in the supply inventory, or because they're a low production item from a subcontractor and they charge Yamaha more per unit for this particular item in order to meet a specific profit point than they do for a similar but higher production pump that are used in more bikes than the pump used in the S10. Without being in on the design team, marketing team, or accounting team, it's difficult to determine if the pump costs that much because of how it's built, or because of how it's sold.
 
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MikeinNZ

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I was looking at a second hand one on EBay generously (not) offered to me for $915 USD.
In the photos you could see the 4 vent holes on the plastic ECU cover were wet with brake fluid.... A tell tale sign it has a leak at the pistons and not worth a dollar.
 

MikeinNZ

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I was thinking if I did buy a new one I would block off the 4 vent holes and drill a new hole for a hose to extend the vent to somewhere clean like under the tank. Only problem would be if it did develop a leak the fluid wouldn’t drain uphill.
Every time I have looked at my unit it is sitting in dirt and sand. It’s like Yamaha forgot to tell Ate (manufacturer) that they were going to mount the thing in a bucket that catches most of the dirt coming off the back wheel
 

Barrel

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Good day

I had exactly the same problem on my 2012 and could not find what was wrong....... and I want to take the time to thank you for this post.

I was able to fix my brake problem following your modifications.

I have shared my and your experiences with other ST riders here in Quebec, Canada!

216,000km on XTZ!

Cheers!

*2 x more cold beers plse!
 
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