2013 super10 rear shock removal

RCinNC

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Does the linkage move when you remove the lower bolt? I tried to push the bolt out with thumb no go, I'm worried about the thread what's the best way to remove the bolt?
When I did mine, I just jiggled the swingarm while pushing out the bolt, and it came out.

I'm assuming you have a centerstand on your bike. If so, there's another way to take the pressure off the bolt in the swingarm so you can remove the shock, if you aren't able to physically lift the wheel to take the pressure off the swingarm bolt. Go to the hardware store and get some of those wooden wedges they sell that help you install a door jamb. They usually come shrink wrapped in a package. Stack up some some small squares of plywood under the rear tire until the tire is close to sitting on them. Then use the wedges to fill up the remaining gap, until the wedges are touching the tire. If you drive the wedges closer together, it'll lift the tire with very little effort, until you relieve the weight on the swingarm bolt. You set the wedges, then pull on the bolt; if it's still too tight, tap the wedges a little closer together. If you go too far, pull the wedges a little further apart. With this method you don't have to hold the weight of the tire with one hand while manipulating the bolt with the other. It will also support the weight of the tire and hold it in the correct position for reinserting the bolt after you change the shock.

I use this wedge method when I change the rear tire on my bike. The wedge holds up the rear tire and takes the weight off the axle, so the axle is easy to remove, and it also supports the tire while it's meshed to the final drive so the tire is easier to pull free.

I've attached a photo of one of the wedges I use. It's just four of those hardware store wedges, glued edge to edge. Gluing them together like that creates more surface area for the tire to sit on.

IMG_20211013_103119.jpg
 
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Nasho279

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Sep 28, 2019
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7
Location
Thornbury. Vic. 3071 Australia.
When I did mine, I just jiggled the swingarm while pushing out the bolt, and it came out.

I'm assuming you have a centerstand on your bike. If so, there's another way to take the pressure off the bolt in the swingarm so you can remove the shock, if you aren't able to physically lift the wheel to take the pressure off the swingarm bolt. Go to the hardware store and get some of those wooden wedges they sell that help you install a door jamb. They usually come shrink wrapped in a package. Stack up some some small squares of plywood under the rear tire until the tire is close to sitting on them. Then use the wedges to fill up the remaining gap, until the wedges are touching the tire. If you drive the wedges closer together, it'll lift the tire with very little effort, until you relieve the weight on the swingarm bolt. You set the wedges, then pull on the bolt; if it's still too tight, tap the wedges a little closer together. If you go too far, pull the wedges a little further apart. With this method you don't have to hold the weight of the tire with one hand while manipulating the bolt with the other. It will also support the weight of the tire and hold it in the correct position for reinserting the bolt after you change the shock.

I use this wedge method when I change the rear tire on my bike. The wedge holds up the rear tire and takes the weight off the axle, so the axle is easy to remove, and it also supports the tire while it's meshed to the final drive so the tire is easier to pull free.

I've attached a photo of one of the wedges I use. It's just four of those hardware store wedges, glued edge to edge. Gluing them together like that creates more surface area for the tire to sit on.

View attachment 85886
 

RCinNC

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The individual wedges are 7 3/4" long by 1 3/8" wide. If your hardware store doesn't carry them (they're called shims), then go to a home improvement center like Lowe's or Home Depot.
 

escapefjrtist

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Snohomish WA
Would a 24" pry bar be long enough? my shock has been leaking oil for how long I don't know but I can't lift the rear wheel by hand.
For sure, just like 'Hawkxx linked, even a longer flat blade screwdriver will work. Until the lower shock bolt is removed you can't lift the rear wheel assembly as you're working against the shock spring.

~G
 

Nasho279

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Sep 28, 2019
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Location
Thornbury. Vic. 3071 Australia.
The individual wedges are 7 3/4" long by 1 3/8" wide. If your hardware store doesn't carry them (they're called shims), then go to a home improvement center like Lowe's or Home Depot.
Ordered 12Pk 8" Nelson wood shims from Gettycrafts Montgoemery NY free shipping to Australia. I've seen your method with the shims on a Revzilla video your picture sold me on the idea, how did you join them together did you use a biscuit joint or dowel?
 

tubebender

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I just put a 1/2" block under the rear tire, then use a scissors jack under the skid plate to tip the bike back till the bolt slides out.

IMG_20130423_195320.jpg
 

jrusell

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Aug 23, 2017
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Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
Do yourself a favour and just take the wheel off first.
You are making your life way harder than it needs to be. Get rid of the weight and then you are just dealing with the swing arm weight which is next to nothing.
You also will have tons more room to work and it will go twice as fast on removal and installation.
 

fac191

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Jun 22, 2016
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London
Am sure when people have done this before they reverse a bolt of make removal easier for next time.
 

Boris

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Dec 21, 2013
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midlands. UK
Do yourself a favour and just take the wheel off first.
You are making your life way harder than it needs to be. Get rid of the weight and then you are just dealing with the swing arm weight which is next to nothing.
You also will have tons more room to work and it will go twice as fast on removal and installation.
This!
 
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