Toy Hauler

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Mar 27, 2015
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Did anyone decide to buy the Pit Bull restraint?

If yes, what do you like about it? What not so much?

I have some concern about the amount of torque it would apply to a plywood floor (what, 5/8"?), as Pit Bull appears to pitch that this product is used without tie downs. That seems to me to be the major advantage they're pitching. That, and the minimal floor space needed to implement the cycle restraint.

So, it seems to me that all the side to side twisting loading has to be managed by a relatively short metal pad bolted to a thin plywood sheet. In general, I have the worst case maximum loading scenario in view when I think about this: Hauling situation has gone sideways (not literally), and the cycle wants to roll towards either trailer side with the driver fighting to keep the load on the road. The last thing I would want is the restraint to fail due to multiple restraint twisting movement (every right / left turn would be a twisting load), over time. All the loading across the floor mount is absorbed across a relatively small area.

I just wonder if I'm over thinking this, or if this restraint is susceptible to an early failure mode at the worst possible time.

Opinions, please? (I'm lookin 'at you, Mr Ungineer to Broked Stuff <wink>)
 
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
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Texas
Did anyone decide to buy the Pit Bull restraint?

If yes, what do you like about it? What not so much?

I have some concern about the amount of torque it would apply to a plywood floor (what, 5/8"?), as Pit Bull appears to pitch that this product is used without tie downs. That seems to me to be the major advantage they're pitching. That, and the minimal floor space needed to implement the cycle restraint.

So, it seems to me that all the side to side twisting loading has to be managed by a relatively short metal pad bolted to a thin plywood sheet. In general, I have the worst case maximum loading scenario in view when I think about this: Hauling situation has gone sideways (not literally), and the cycle wants to roll towards either trailer side with the driver fighting to keep the load on the road. The last thing I would want is the restraint to fail due to multiple restraint twisting movement (every right / left turn would be a twisting load), over time. All the loading across the floor mount is absorbed across a relatively small area.

I just wonder if I'm over thinking this, or if this restraint is susceptible to an early failure mode at the worst possible time.

Opinions, please? (I'm lookin 'at you, Mr Ungineer to Broked Stuff <wink>)
For me it would depend on the type of trailer you have. In my toy hauler, the d-rings are screwed down (through the wood floor) to either the frame, or a metal cross bar. That should be sufficient to handle the forces. If you mounted this system like that, you should not have a problem.

For my trailer, I would not get something like this as it would mean the mounting plate or assembly would be in the living area. If I had a dedicated garage, I would look into something like this, as I have had straps come off when I have hit major bumps that compress the suspension of the bike.
 
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May 4, 2018
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Indianapolis, IN
I use a pit bull with my (lighter) F650GS. It bolts through the plywood, to the cross member of the trailer. You have some latitude as to where you screw down the pit bull plate, you can angle the U frame forward or backwards.

I hit some terrible whoop-de-dos on the Interstate coming home last weekend. No warning signs, but I was moving a pretty good pace. The truck jumped and bucked so hard my head hit the roof liner. I thought sure, the bike would have come loose. But I was close to home, and I could see no trailer damage in the mirror, so I kept rolling. Got home, checked the back end. My (empty) wall mounted tool cabinet came off the wall, pulled six screws right out of that light plywood. But the bike was sitting right where it was supposed to be.

I use an HF wheel chock for my wife's maxi scooter, I can load it alone, but it is not easy. Wants to tip until I get both straps on. The pit bull is much easier, working alone. And when I use the trailer for hauling other stuff, the grabber portion of the pit bull has a pin release on each side, it only sticks up a 1/4 or 1/2 inch when you take away the top two layers. Ya I'm sold on them, my next bike will be a bit heavier (S10 or 1200GS) but I'm sure I will use the pit bull system. Just wish I could use it on my wife's bike, they do not make an axle pin for her.
 
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For me it would depend on the type of trailer you have. In my toy hauler, the d-rings are screwed down (through the wood floor) to either the frame, or a metal cross bar. That should be sufficient to handle the forces. If you mounted this system like that, you should not have a problem.

For my trailer, I would not get something like this as it would mean the mounting plate or assembly would be in the living area. If I had a dedicated garage, I would look into something like this, as I have had straps come off when I have hit major bumps that compress the suspension of the bike.
I'm looking at the Falcon F-23TH. I agree with you that the plate placement would be optimal through a metal cross member. I think I'll need to see one of these trailers in person, and then look at / photograph / measure the structural member placement across the chassis bottom. Strange the Travel Lite website does not show the dimensions of the floor plan for the living space / garage space. I'll need to move two cycles back (towards the rear door) as far as they'll go, and then see if the Pit Bull plates will align up with a chassis metal member. I can live with the plates inside the "garage" space. It may mean tripping over them occasionally, but if everything else works out, I'll live with that. I believe that also means that only one side of the Pit Bull plate will be secured to a metal member, but I think that will be OK to absorb the rocking (side to side) loads.
 
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I use a pit bull with my (lighter) F650GS. It bolts through the plywood, to the cross member of the trailer. You have some latitude as to where you screw down the pit bull plate, you can angle the U frame forward or backwards.

I hit some terrible whoop-de-dos on the Interstate coming home last weekend. No warning signs, but I was moving a pretty good pace. The truck jumped and bucked so hard my head hit the roof liner. I thought sure, the bike would have come loose. But I was close to home, and I could see no trailer damage in the mirror, so I kept rolling. Got home, checked the back end. My (empty) wall mounted tool cabinet came off the wall, pulled six screws right out of that light plywood. But the bike was sitting right where it was supposed to be.

I use an HF wheel chock for my wife's maxi scooter, I can load it alone, but it is not easy. Wants to tip until I get both straps on. The pit bull is much easier, working alone. And when I use the trailer for hauling other stuff, the grabber portion of the pit bull has a pin release on each side, it only sticks up a 1/4 or 1/2 inch when you take away the top two layers. Ya I'm sold on them, my next bike will be a bit heavier (S10 or 1200GS) but I'm sure I will use the pit bull system. Just wish I could use it on my wife's bike, they do not make an axle pin for her.
This is a great story, thanks so much for sharing it. This reads like you've had the Pit Bull restraint system pretty close to the limits vertically. I can just imagine that BMW bouncing around in the back of your trailer. It's a nice testimonial. Thanks for sharing it.

You do not mention it, but I assume there were no anchoring straps in use? That is, just the Pit Bull, right? Also, did you use any non-standard hardware to mount the Pit Bull to the frame member? Maybe you decided to use larger / longer / thicker / "harder" fasteners?
 
Joined
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Texas
I'm looking at the Falcon F-23TH. I agree with you that the plate placement would be optimal through a metal cross member. I think I'll need to see one of these trailers in person, and then look at / photograph / measure the structural member placement across the chassis bottom. Strange the Travel Lite website does not show the dimensions of the floor plan for the living space / garage space. I'll need to move two cycles back (towards the rear door) as far as they'll go, and then see if the Pit Bull plates will align up with a chassis metal member. I can live with the plates inside the "garage" space. It may mean tripping over them occasionally, but if everything else works out, I'll live with that. I believe that also means that only one side of the Pit Bull plate will be secured to a metal member, but I think that will be OK to absorb the rocking (side to side) loads.
Not sure I would feel comfortable with just one side bolted to the crossmember. But if you can get to the underside, putting some kind of metal plate underneath that is a foot square or so to distribute the load I would think would work.

Coming home last week with my trailer, I would have swore that it went airborne on a good bump (thanks Tennessee). I was looking in the mirror to see if my handle bars were sticking out the side. Luckily only some of the stuff was thrown around.

Sent from my SM-G930U using Tapatalk
 
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Not sure I would feel comfortable with just one side bolted to the crossmember. But if you can get to the underside, putting some kind of metal plate underneath that is a foot square or so to distribute the load I would think would work.

Coming home last week with my trailer, I would have swore that it went airborne on a good bump (thanks Tennessee). I was looking in the mirror to see if my handle bars were sticking out the side. Luckily only some of the stuff was thrown around.

Sent from my SM-G930U using Tapatalk
I read this as another positive story regarding the Pit Bull. Thanks for relating it. I'm thinking if I can get the mounting squared away, I'm going this route.

Thanks to all for sharing their stories.
 
Joined
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Indianapolis, IN
This is a great story, thanks so much for sharing it. This reads like you've had the Pit Bull restraint system pretty close to the limits vertically. I can just imagine that BMW bouncing around in the back of your trailer. It's a nice testimonial. Thanks for sharing it.

You do not mention it, but I assume there were no anchoring straps in use? That is, just the Pit Bull, right? Also, did you use any non-standard hardware to mount the Pit Bull to the frame member? Maybe you decided to use larger / longer / thicker / "harder" fasteners?
No straps. Judging from the tire marks on the (traction) floor, it did lots of wiggling, but all within an inch or two.

I can not recall what bolts I used to hold the plate to the floor. If memory serves, two screws are through the plywood AND the frame. The other two are just through plywood. If I think of it tomorrow, if the rain stops, I'll stick my head under and verify. Also occurs to me I could check if the bolts are still tight and straight. I need to re-mount the wall cabinet anyway, but it will need a frame of some sort to hold it in place, I guess.

FWIW- I have a 6 x 12 single axle trailer, V-front. I wonder if a dual axle trailer would give a smoother ride.


-Dan
 
Joined
May 4, 2018
Messages
34
Likes
8
Location
Indianapolis, IN
This is a great story, thanks so much for sharing it. This reads like you've had the Pit Bull restraint system pretty close to the limits vertically. I can just imagine that BMW bouncing around in the back of your trailer. It's a nice testimonial. Thanks for sharing it.

You do not mention it, but I assume there were no anchoring straps in use? That is, just the Pit Bull, right? Also, did you use any non-standard hardware to mount the Pit Bull to the frame member? Maybe you decided to use larger / longer / thicker / "harder" fasteners?
Stuck my head under there today, two bolts through frame members, the other two just thru the floor. No bending on the frame members. The ones through plywood have big fender washers. All bolts look to be Grade 8, with nylon insert locknuts. Big suckers, I think 1/2 or, maybe 7/16. I did not mount that to the floor, when I got to thinking about it, two sets were mounted by the fellow that set up the trailer. I bought it used, a year or two old. I took out one of the pit bulls, as mentioned, it doesn't fit my wife's bike.

-Dan
 
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