KTM 790 Adventure R - a likely replacement for my S10.

gv550

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#21
Interesting to note the 790 comes equipped with heated grips, quick shifter and cruise control but none of those features work unless you pay an optional $300 each to have the dealer activate them.
 

blitz11

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#23
Really? Someone will break that code.
I just found out that my new GE refrigerator has a water filter with an RFID tag in it! I've had it for six months, and it flagged a code.

Every 6 months, you're expected to replace it, and if you do not, the refrigerator will shut that feature off. With the new RFID tag, the refrigerator knows when a new one is installed. B@st@rds!

There is a hack on the internet (of course), so i'll replace it for now, and when i am not so busy, i'll see if i can make the hack work.

Electronics good. Electronics bad.
 

Sierra1

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#24
….Electronics good. Electronics bad.
Similar story: top load, basic GE washer, with a circuit board. 6 months past the warranty....circuit board goes bad....possibly from being "overloaded". Circuit board is 75% of a new washer. I had been a fan of all GE products for decades; no longer after reading more stories like blitz's and mine. Sign of the times.
 

twinrider

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#25
Looks great, really impressive. I'm sure it'll be a cracking bike.

Go treat yourself and enjoy it.
The Triumph is a nice looking bike, but I like the styling of the 790 better - each to his own.

I get a bit confused when you claim the Triumph has better specs - the 790 Adventure R is lighter, has more horse power, bigger fuel tank, better standard crash protection, 18" vs 17" rear wheel and it seems better suited for carrying luggage.
Suspension travel, ground clearance and wheel base is about the same on the two bikes.
The KTM 790 makes 6hp more at peak but it's only cranking out 64.9 ft.lbs of torque at 6600 rpm, while the Triumph is churning out 81.1 ft.lbs at just 3900 rpm. The Triumph's high torque means effortless power at any RPM, just twist the wrist and GO. No need to keep the engine on the boil.

Jury's out on the weight of the two bikes till a third party mag weighs them. KTM is notorious for fudging its weights.

I can't see any crash protection on the KTM, but it has a lot more plastic to damage. Put some engine guards on the Triumph and it'll be bulletproof.

18" vs 17" rear wheel, plenty of tires available for both these days.

If you like the KTM great. But I'd be testing that Triumph before I plunked my money down. ;-)

http://instagr.am/p/BtlTvBxFNtv/
 

markjenn

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#27
I spoke to the KTM people at EICMA and they confirmed that both the versions of the 790 Adventure comes standard with tubeless ready rims. This has since been confirmed from other trust worthy sources.
Well, KTM spec control is notoriously unreliable and there have been multiple instances of KTM saying one thing and doing another. And what the heck does "tubeless ready" mean?

We'll see.

- Mark
 

Don T

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#28
Well, KTM spec control is notoriously unreliable and there have been multiple instances of KTM saying one thing and doing another. And what the heck does "tubeless ready" mean?

We'll see.

- Mark
This is KTM's solution to tubeless spoked rims:
 

Don T

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#29
I went on the KTM TALK site. There is so many problems with KTMs its mind boggling.
Yeah - especially when coming form a dead reliable and trouble free bike like the S10, it can feel a bit daunting to consider a European bike, but as mentioned before, I get the impression that reliability have improved on the latest KTM models.
 

Don T

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#30
The KTM 790 makes 6hp more at peak but it's only cranking out 64.9 ft.lbs of torque at 6600 rpm, while the Triumph is churning out 81.1 ft.lbs at just 3900 rpm. The Triumph's high torque means effortless power at any RPM, just twist the wrist and GO. No need to keep the engine on the boil.

Jury's out on the weight of the two bikes till a third party mag weighs them. KTM is notorious for fudging its weights.

I can't see any crash protection on the KTM, but it has a lot more plastic to damage. Put some engine guards on the Triumph and it'll be bulletproof.

18" vs 17" rear wheel, plenty of tires available for both these days.

If you like the KTM great. But I'd be testing that Triumph before I plunked my money down. ;-)

http://instagr.am/p/BtlTvBxFNtv/
Either way both bikes will have more than enough power for my intended use.

Isn't all brand notorious for fudging the claimed weight of their bikes? - time will tell how it is in the case of these 2 models.

The lower part of the fuel tank (with a protective shield) doubles as crash protection on the 790 which eliminates the need of adding crash bars.

Bigger diameter improves the wheels ability to handle rough surfaces. In my experience 18 vs 17" rear wheel makes a differens, albeit not as big as 19 vs 21" front wheel.

If I get the chance I'll take the Triumph for a spin as well. Specs can give you an indication of what to expect from a bike - only a proper test ride can tell you the full story. Test rides have previously left me both very disappointed and pleasantly surprised.
 
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tallpaul

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#31
The lower part of the fuel tank (with a protective shield) doubles as crash protection on the 790 which eliminates the need of adding crash bars.
Anybody else freaked out about this? Using a plastic fuel tank as crash protection, especially sliding it down a road, sounds optimistic at best and downright dangerous at worst. Plastic may work for impact strength but I wouldn't like to risk it for serious abrasion scenarios. The chances of a spark occurring are just too great.

Edit: my apologies, I misread. You did mention the factory protective shield.
 

limey

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#32
I put a deposit down in December for the 790, I was waiting for the T7 but I’m not waiting another 2 years for a bike that’s been in development for 3 years.
 

Sierra1

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#33
Anybody else freaked out about this? Using a plastic fuel tank as crash protection,.... The chances of a spark occurring are just too great....
That was my thought initially. But, back when Pintos were blowing up, the fix was a very thick piece of plastic between the fuel tank, and car body to eliminate the spark(s). Plastic doesn't spark; so as long as the tank/crash bar is thick enough.... But, IF, KTM has as many issues as y'all say....I would think twice, and research the heck out of it.
 
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#34
I think that's a formidable bike, and if the engine is tuned similarly to the Duke 790 it will be a gem -- certainly more powerful than the Tenere 700. I like the tank/crashbar concept too. Seems to make lots of sense in terms of COG.

Having said that, to my eye the Yamaha looks better -- less busy. And not sure I'd trust a first year model KTM/engine.
 

Don T

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#35
Anybody else freaked out about this? Using a plastic fuel tank as crash protection, especially sliding it down a road, sounds optimistic at best and downright dangerous at worst. Plastic may work for impact strength but I wouldn't like to risk it for serious abrasion scenarios. The chances of a spark occurring are just too great.

Edit: my apologies, I misread. You did mention the factory protective shield.
I have no concerns regarding the fuel tank doubling as crash protection. For 5 years I was riding a WR² with a Safari tank, where the tank doubled as radiator/crash protection. I used the little Yamaha for hardcore off road only (participated in EnduRomania 5 times on the bike) I crashed countless times where the tank received serious hits/abrasions without ever leaving more than superficial scratches. They can make seriously tough plastic nowadays.

P5030016.JPG

I imagine that the reason for the (replaceable) protective shield on the 790, is just a extra precaution in case of high speed crashes on tarmac.
In any case, and as already mentioned by Sierra1, plastic is really bad at generating sparks...
 
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tallpaul

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#36
Good point, but my concern about sparks was due to all the other bits of steel on the bike that will also come into contact with the floor as well as the tank. As you say, the tank is likely to be seriously tough.
 

Don T

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#37
I think that's a formidable bike, and if the engine is tuned similarly to the Duke 790 it will be a gem -- certainly more powerful than the Tenere 700. I like the tank/crashbar concept too. Seems to make lots of sense in terms of COG.

Having said that, to my eye the Yamaha looks better -- less busy. And not sure I'd trust a first year model KTM/engine.
I felt the same way regarding looks until I saw both bikes in the flesh.
I wouldn't be comfortable buying a first year model either - even though the 790 engine have been in production for some time now.
 

limey

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#38
I think that's a formidable bike, and if the engine is tuned similarly to the Duke 790 it will be a gem -- certainly more powerful than the Tenere 700. I like the tank/crashbar concept too. Seems to make lots of sense in terms of COG.

Having said that, to my eye the Yamaha looks better -- less busy. And not sure I'd trust a first year model KTM/engine.
It’s not the first year.
 

Madhatter

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#40
the 690 is about 74 hp ,mid 300's in weight , the 790 is about 105 hp and probably about 400 +- in weight ….. our local dealer has two 790's in stock at 13,999.00 , the 690 at 12,000.00 …. they are here now , you can put your hands on them …. I do not think the Yamaha T7 is going to compete well if at all unless its lighter more powerful and cost a lot less than its competition. it would have been better had they spent time doing a major up grade on the super tenere . 50cc displacement increase , 30 or 40 hp bump , improved ABS , ergos tweeked to fix known complaints , to be competitive with its competiton (1200+cc bikes ) BMW is about 135hp now , triumph is about 135 hp , KTM is about 160hp Ducati 160 hp . I could be wrong but did I see on this site that there are 7000 plus members , all waiting to at somepoint replace their ageing machines.... I have a 2012 , I still like it after all this time , it is a great motorcycle . but at some point if I still have the passion to ride I may want something new and updated , so that leaves out Yamaha ….sad.
 
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