I've never used the kill switch to shut off the bike

Don in Lodi

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#21
I don't usually even think about it. I'd say 90 some-odd percent of the time I use the side stand switch. I leave the bike in gear most all the time except right when starting it. I've only used the kill switch a few times, once on a tip over that pinned me... the tip over switch didn't work that time.
Front of the roll btw.
 

EricV

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#24
Now let's discuss if the toilet paper is supposed to be dropping off the front or the back of the roll ....

(I am a front of the roll & kill switch kind of guy)
I though everyone knew that off the front is the correct way, UNLESS you own a cat. If you own a cat, (or cats and some very young children), then off the back saves you a lot of grief! Kitties are much better at pawing the roll from the front than pulling the paper from the back.
 

EricV

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#25
I used to always use the kill switch until I had a kill switch almost go out on me on a trip. Since then I use the key.
And yet, you no longer own that bike, do you? ;) And if you do, FIX IT. :D
 
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#27
Great topic. I always wondered about this. I kind of thought it was for emergencies, but also maybe it was a holdover that pertained to older times/bikes. I.E. carburetor vs. EI.

I did find this video that explains it very well: MC Garage - Kill Switch
 

HeliMark

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#29
Key, for the last 65K miles. no hard starts. If parking on a hill that I want to leave it in gear, I just extend the kickstand, which kills it, then the key.
 

robson

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#30
I do both , probably kill switch most of the time , some times use the key just because.... I always remove key after kill switch or key ….. its kinda like which side of the toilet paper works best for you...
exactly, there is absolutely no difference which you use key, kill switch or side stand. Been discussed already before.
 

squarebore

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#31
I usually use the key.
Only when I park on an incline where I want to leave the bike in gear and need to hold the brake lever do I use the kill switch.
Plus one. And that is the correct method according to my cousin's sister's friend who has an uncle that cleaned houses for a guy that lived down the road from a guy who designed motorbikes. I hope that ends the argument.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

EricV

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#32
Eric, I do not know if there are differences in the models, but in mine (2018 ES), with the switch turned OFF, if you turn the key to ON, you feel that the fuel pump is activated,
and stops after 2 seconds, when it reaches the working pressure
I read that the kill switch, is a safety stop, in case that the throttle is locked (full), so as not necessary to release the handlebar to turn the key off....
My 2015 does not engage the fuel pump with the kill switch to 'stop'. I can turn the key on and the pump will not come on to pressurize the system until I move the kill switch to 'run'. The '12 I had was the same way, though they changed the kill switch designs physically for Gen II bikes to one with the starter incorporated into the kill switch. And yes, all do the same with pressurizing the system and turning off until you start the bike. I just don't have a need to do that until I'm ready to start the bike. :)

I agree, it's a safety feature. (so why ignore a safety feature available to you?) Using it all the time helps cement your muscle memory too, so you're not fumbling for it in panic mode if you need it in an emergency. Ever go to turn on the flashers in the dark? I have to really think about that one, since I almost never use the flashers. One time I ended up fussing with the mode switch for a couple of minutes before figuring out the flashers were below that.

35 years of running industrial machinery has left me with ingrained habits. The master switch is always the final thing to turn off, which would be the key switch for the bike. The power off switch is more commonly used in day to day to power down the machinery. That's more like the kill switch on the bike. Still leaves some parts of the machinery powered. Perhaps this explains my habits?

To you visor up riders - Sell the full face or modular helmet if you want a 3/4 helmet. Buying an expensive piece of safety equipment and choosing to wear it so it provides less safety is foolish. And you look like a fool to just about everyone else too. Like sport bike guys wearing $1k carbon fiber helmets with tank tops/shorts. :rolleyes:
 

Nikolajsen

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#33
As I said before, I don't think it matters much. :rolleyes: That you don't understand a linear procedure and why it's considered proper method of use is fine. It's your choice to do so.
..... strange answer on a serious question, about how/why the system is designed to be switch off with kill switch.o_O
 

Propsoto

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#34
Neutral, then key off for me. It does make sense to use the kill switch for muscle memory. But the only bikes I’ve ever had a throttle stick on, were dirt bikes without keys. On both, it was instinct to hit the kill switch.

For your amusement....at a party recently, someone must have been fiddling with my bike. I hop on and it won’t start. Neutral, check, sidestand check, WTH? Sat there longer than I’d care to admit before flipping the kill switch.
 

Antanas

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#35
To you visor up riders - Sell the full face or modular helmet if you want a 3/4 helmet. Buying an expensive piece of safety equipment and choosing to wear it so it provides less safety is foolish. And you look like a fool to just about everyone else too. Like sport bike guys wearing $1k carbon fiber helmets with tank tops/shorts. :rolleyes:
Visor up dark goggles down on proper helmets. No more comments o_O
 

EricV

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#37
Man, I think some blood pressures got raised on this one....and such an innocent question.
No rise in BP here. The kill switch Vs key switch debate is probably as much about what you were taught for your first bike as preference.
 

Sierra1

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#38
....The reason is likely based on something that no longer applies.
....The kill switch Vs key switch debate is probably as much about what you were taught for your first bike as preference.
When I first started, I always used the key; never was taught/explained the "why" of the kill switch. But, MUCH later, the side stand became the method of choice, based on expediency and safety. But, yes, it no longer applies; 20 years of muscle memory does not go away quickly. To me, now, the biggest reason NOT to use the side stand is if I get distracted, and DON'T remove the key....dead battery.
 

Cycledude

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#39
Seems with the Tenere I’ve developed the habit of mostly using the side stand when I want to shut off the bike and that’s probably because the key switch is a little more difficult to reach than it was on any other bike I’ve ever owned.

The only issue using the side stand is it’s easy to forget to turn off the key so the battery doesn’t get drained but that has only happened to me once.
 
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