Filter change - every or every other oil change

Filter change - every or every other oil change

  • Every time

    Votes: 25 89.3%
  • Every other time

    Votes: 3 10.7%

  • Total voters
    28

BaldKnob

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#41
I've been changing the filter with each oil change (every 5K miles) but will change to every other now that the new has worn off. The FD fluid was changed 3x's before 10K miles but now is changed every other oil change, unless I do stupid stuff like this... IMG_0787.JPG
 

Longdog Cymru

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#42
Change the filter every oil change, it’s a no-brainer.

Someone on here said he sands down crush washers, come on guys, a crush washer is a throwaway part, ok, if it’s copper, then you can anneal it and reuse it but after spending some serious money on a motorcycle/car/truck/lawn mower, etc why would you skimp on something that costs so little?
 
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#43
Someone on here said he sands down crush washers, come on guys, a crush washer is a throwaway part, ok, if it’s copper, then you can anneal it and reuse it but after spending some serious money on a motorcycle/car/truck/lawn mower, etc why would you skimp on something that costs so little?
I hear you there!! There are always a few guys who make it a point to brag how little they maintain their bikes and reuse old crap. Reusing a .01 cent washer is senseless.
 
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#45
I hear you there!! There are always a few guys who make it a point to brag how little they maintain their bikes and reuse old crap. Reusing a .01 cent washer is senseless.
My 2012 Raven had the original crush washers when I traded it in at 130K miles... never had an oil leak.
I rest my case......
 

Sierra1

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#46
There is also something to be said on how the bike shifts with fresh oil. I can always tell a difference in how smooth the bike goes into gear with fresh oil.
That is SO true with my FJ. At 3k miles, I'll miss a gear shift....like clock work. The Tenere doesn't feel any different at 1 mile after oil change or 4k miles later; totally different beast(s). For the longest time, I didn't even know that I was supposed to change my drain plug washer; never had a leak. But, now I know....
 

RonH

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#48
I never change the crush washer on any motorcycle I've ever owned and never have had a leak. I bought a pack of 10 for the goldwing 11yrs ago because of threads where several guys acted like it was crucial to change them. I still have 10. Maybe some guys over torque and ruin the washer? Don't know, but torque to spec and never a leak.
Strange thing on the GL1800, it seems like most guys that believe in changing the final drive lube 6 times or whatever, before the recommended first change are nearly always the guys that have failure early. Sometimes overdoing things has no real benefit.
 

taskmaster86

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#49
For reference sake, how many miles did you ride in that 2 years? Oil changes are really more mileage dependent than time, though the advertising would have you believe oil goes bad just sitting there. Acids can develop, but that's another thread. I don't think your method is a problem for your needs.
It was about 6,000 miles and two years total that I left the filter on. I change the oil every 3 to 4 thousand miles because that is about what I end up doing for miles in a year. I wish I had more time and opportunity to ride and get the mileage up but it is what it is.

The factory maintenance schedule wants us to change the filter every 12,000 miles so I am still way undercutting Yamaha's service recommendation by changing the filter every 2 years and 6 to 8 thousand miles or so.
 
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#50
I never change the crush washer on any motorcycle I've ever owned and never have had a leak. I bought a pack of 10 for the goldwing 11yrs ago because of threads where several guys acted like it was crucial to change them. I still have 10. Maybe some guys over torque and ruin the washer? Don't know, but torque to spec and never a leak.
Strange thing on the GL1800, it seems like most guys that believe in changing the final drive lube 6 times or whatever, before the recommended first change are nearly always the guys that have failure early. Sometimes overdoing things has no real benefit.
I for one will not buy something just because I "read it on a forum thread". I change my crush washers because it's cheap and simple. My KTM 300, Beta both trans and motor side, and both Toyota Lexus's use the same washer so it's a no brainer. I do agree it's not crucial. BTW, crush washers are ruined as soon as they are used once. Never heard of a driveline failure because it was over lubed?

That is why a lot of guys purchase Japanese bikes. It's proven time and time again you can beat the crap out of these bikes and get super lazy on maintaining them with no ill effects. These threads always have guys like myself that are very picky about keeping our bikes running in top shape. On the other side of the spectrum you have the guys who just ride the crap out of them, skimp on proper service, and wait until something breaks. Sometimes it don't break. It's a roll of the dice for sure.
 

EricV

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#51
There are two types of washers generally referred to as "crush washers". One is a hollow washer that does indeed crush as it is tightened. These are technically one time use, though the world doesn't end if you re-use them and many people do.

The other type of 'crush washer' is a solid copper or aluminum washer that will deform if you over torque the drain/fill bolt, hopefully saving your threads in the case. These are commonly re-used until they deform so much that they become thin and would not offer any protection from over tightening. Some diligently anneal these prior to re-using them. No harm in that, but it's a little over kill for the application.

In factory fresh form, the Super Ten uses both types. My '12 came with the hollow style crush washer on the oil drain plugs and the solid style on the final drive drain and fill plugs. Only Yamaha's assembly team knows why. I changed to solid copper style at the first oil change and may have replaced them a few times in 109k miles, but certainly not every time.

As far as Japanese Vs other brands. When you get used to a high maintenance bike, it's hard to get your head around low maintenance bikes. It's not poor maintenance or lazy to follow the manufacturer's maintenance schedule. It's just a better made bike. It doesn't need maintenance after every ride. 90% of what a KTM owner thinks is necessary, is necessary on a KTM, and totally superfluous on a Yamaha.
 

Fennellg

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#53
There is a saying I have coined being an avid motorcyclist and in the car industry forever. Its antidotal and based solely on what I have seen and read.

"If it comes out of Italy, Germany, or England and has a motor run don't walk away. " I know this will generate heat. And I respect the people who have gotten high miles out their bikes. But if you are playing the odds they don't favor you. You can throw money at any problem or get lucky. :)
 
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